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Aperol spritz - alcoholic cocktail

bartender preparing alcoholic aperitif, aperol spritz cocktail

Aperol spritz

Although Aperol is one of the many different drinks that fall into the category of aperitifs, it stands out because of its main ingredients. Aperol is made according to a secret recipe that has not changed since the drink was created in 1919. While the company could not disclose the exact recipe, it did share that the key ingredients are bitter and sweet oranges, rhubarb and a variety of herbs and spices. The Internet may have started debating the merits of Aperol this summer, but drinkers have enthusiastically enjoyed the beverage for 100 years. It was first created by two brothers named Luigi and Silvio Barbieri, and according to Marquis, they spent seven years in research and development. When the product met their standards, the Barbieri brothers presented it for the first time at a fair in Padua, Italy. Because it's an aperitif, Aperol is traditionally consumed before meals, but now the folks at Campari American say it's the perfect drink at any time of day thanks to its low alcohol content of 11%. It also turns out that there is a reason why Aperol Spritzes are so popular. Aperol was invented in 1919, but it wasn't until after World War II that Aperol really gained global attention. The Italian lifestyle, enjoying an "apéritif" before dinner, conquered the world. The slang word for apéritif is "apéro," hence the name Aperol. Flavors noted in descriptions of Aperol include bitter orange, bitters, rhubard and cinchona among other ingredients.

 This is worth remembering!

The brand gained popularity in the early 20th century, but it wasn't until the 1950s that the official recipe for the Aperol spritz was born. Sip was a hit in its native Italy as an aperitivo - a kind of light, low-ABV pre-dinner drink to refresh you from the day and prepare your appetite for the evening. The cocktail gradually made its way across the Atlantic as well, when Aperol was acquired by Gruppo Campari in the early 2000s, and the group put serious advertising power behind the Aperol spritz, making it the drink of choice at media-friendly events such as The Governor's Ball and BottleRock, beginning a surge in popularity in the state that is still going strong today. When the Austrians controlled the Veneto after the Napoleonic Wars, they took local Italian wine and added a splash, or in German, a "spritz" of water. In time, the water was replaced by sparkling water, and the still wine was turned into liquor-fortified wine. It didn't take long before the liquor of choice became what we call Aperol today. It gained popularity throughout Italy between 1920 and 1930 and was marketed as a drink for women and people with active lifestyles. The Aperol Spritz recipe gained notoriety after a television commercial in Italy in 1950 and began to spread worldwide in the 1980s and 1990s. The Campari Group bought Aperol in 2003 and launched a massive advertising and marketing campaign that positioned Aperol Spritz as a drink for the creative, fashionable and successful. Today, Aperol Spritz is one of the most popular drinks around the world.

Summary

The cocktail also gradually made its way across the Atlantic when Aperol was acquired by Gruppo Campari in early 2000, and the group put serious advertising power behind the Aperol spritz, making it the drink of choice at media-friendly events such as The Governor's Ball and BottleRock, beginning a rise in popularity in the state that is still going strong today. When the gods and conquerors of ancient Greece were partying... there were certain codes of conduct. Rule number one? Always mix wine with water. Drinking undiluted wine was considered un-elegant! Diluting concentrated wines allowed drinkers to restrain themselves. And besides, it gave these ancient party animals more energy, extending their buzz and prolonging the events they attended. Recipes for these diluted cocktails evolved during ancient Roman rule. Setin was a concoction of wine and snow (which Augustus apparently loved), Mulsum mixed with honey, while Conditum consisted of herbs, spices, seeds and more, and refined Rosatum contained rose petals to dilute the wine. Aperol was created in 1919, but it wasn't until a 1990 marketing campaign that really launched this orange liqueur into a global phenomenon. Imagine an ad filled with young, attractive, carefree people drinking Aperol during the day. Easy, airy... the ad promoted a lifestyle and culture in line with after-work relaxation, well practiced in Venice but not fully popularized throughout the country. At the time, the drink was also formally introduced to bartenders from Florence to Rome and throughout southern Italy - with the idea that the lower alcohol content would appease drinkers who were trying to limit their intake. In early 2000, Aperol was acquired by Gruppo Campari, and a subsequent advertising push made it a drink for socializing and laid-back gatherings in our modern times.

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